A Day In The Big Apple: Seeing Ground Zero, and Running Around In Chinatown.

image1
Standard

With a woman saying nice to meet you to everyone, the start of the journey began. Well, not really I can safely say that it began in my dormitory the night before when I contacted the adviser to the project Jackie DiBella. Who told me with a document that I would have to wake and get to the bus to the station by 4:30 in the morning, and there was a party, loud and unstoppable, only a few halls down. We have three officers on board and I was too slow at the keyboard in order to type down, Gary and Larry were the two bus drivers that ran the expedition. Meeting the tour director would occur at NYC. The speech ending with “sit back and relax” I had just been roused out a of a sound sleep at three am in the morning, yet I was still stoked to go, and felt that there was nothing that could go wrong in any way, shape, or from here.

We drove for six hours, and after an eternity made our way to Zuccotti Park, where I accomplished one of my childhood dreams. I had my first slice of NYC pizza. You have not lived until you have has a slice at NYC. The park itself held a protest against Wall Street at that park a few years ago. And after the lunch we headed straight to the museum.

It really started with s going to the ground zero memorial exhibit, where we split up independently to view it. The entrance was well fortified by metal detectors, armed guards, and lengthy security procedures. The hall beyond led into a huge foyer, and just inside the museum, the first sight gripped me. There were glass panels, and not ordinary. They somehow had projectors that made it so words would be produced in the shape of North America, in every language I could think of. They towered at least ten feet tall, and they were arranged in such a pattern that the whole of the U.S could only be seen from an angle at the beginning of the tour.

I saw the size of something called “the last pillar” before I even entered the exhibit which was about, in diameter, as long as I am and extended from the ground to the highest points of the trade center before it was destroyed. Its base served a reminder to the grandeur of this titan, and the rest of what was left had been signed by family members of those who had died there, and moved to a location I didn’t know. There was one last exhibit titled, “Trying To Remember the Color of the Sky on That September Morning,” before the major exhibit itself, where dozens if not hundreds of different hues and shades of blue silhouetted against a wall that was around twenty feet tall, and maybe fifty feet or so wide. Some words staunchly peered against it in lead, gray writing saying:

No day shall erase you from the memory of time.

I scoured the museum in search of something memorable, and I found it: I did not suspect it to be so emotional. The museum itself held a collection of audio files of those that had been in the fires before they died, and memorabilia from that moment. I can not show you what truly went on in the actual center, but perhaps I can give you a small glimpse. Twisted metal, broken concrete, police badges, broken fire fighter helmets, bandannas, backpacks, notes, and quotes of those transcribed upon the wall for all to see. It was the stories that weren’t told in high school are what struck me. Stories like a civilian running in the debris with a red bandana, saving anyone he could in the wreckage, and his body showing not too long after. Or how a man called his little girl at 8:59, and then 9:00 am saying things like “ I think were safe in this building,” and “ It’s terrible. It’s terrible,” are the things I can’t shake from my mind. Along with a memorial to what it was before this and every manner of dedication to it after it was obliterated, my mindset focused on how it would have been like to be there. I saw paintings, wreathes, and posters to the sites history, before and after; even a comic by marvel for it, appropriately named “Heroes”.

There were ways to involve if you wanted to leave your mark there. You could leave a signature for the archives and a quote for future generations to stare on what you had left behind. There was also a room in which you could record statements of how you thought this was important to remember, or how everything has changed in the last several years since that day. I signed up for both the recording and the signature. Maybe you will see my name and the words “I was not there, but I will remember.” on one of the digital plaques, or hear my recording.

After an hour of us students walking alone, we finally assembled into a mass with the help of some coordinating from Jackie and our tour guide Steve. We had some stragglers and were waiting for about fifteen minutes. I promised then and there, outside near the shinning pools of the memorial, that I would not leave the side of the group, and work to my utmost capability to prevent myself from getting lost.

We toured a little more, jay-walked past a small army of cops in broad sight, and took a view of the legendary Statue of Liberty, and even saw Ellis Island not far behind. We traveled around the city for not much longer and then made our way past Broadway and deeper into the Lower East Side of Manhattan.

We had stopped by Chinatown, the home of “Rolex” watches, and “Prada” bags, and although I wasn’t much of a shopper, this was Chinatown in NYC! Suffice to say I was bouncing out of my chair when the tour guide said. “Hey you guys want to go shopping around here?” And I was the first one out. Somehow I had got it through my brain that he said, “show at the corner of Canal and Mulberry street in Little Italy. You’ll be able to tell by the Neon sign. Not show at blah, blah, blah.” I thought I heard 5:45 but I heard him say 6:45 at one point too, thank you lack of sleep. And so, I marched into the throngs of the metropolis, where I bought a cool hat and a few knick knacks for me and my folks, huzzah! I even got a few pictures of the San Gennaro Festival at Little Italy. But this was was short lived, I showed at the place I thought I was supposed to show, and no one was there. I hastily checked my phone and, of course, there was no power. I was stuck in one of the largest cities in the world, and had no way of contacting anyone that could get me out. So I did what any sane, rational human being would do: I started running up to strangers and asked if I could take their phones for just a second. Well, I wasn’t that harsh, but the looks I was given suggested so; personally I don’t blame them, someone asking to email someone does sound odd, not dangerous but odd. After about an hour of struggle, talking to police officers about if there was a library in a ten mile radius, and a visit to Starbucks where I failed in acquiring a usb cord, I found a kind woman, with who I assumed is her boyfriend, who agreed to help me out. She gave me her phone for a second, while I kept saying they could do it themselves, since trusting a strange kid with a weird story is kind of unheard of. I messed with her phone for about five minutes while her much taller and stronger than me bodyguard/boyfriend stood watching me like I was a poisonous serpent. I then tapped the button for sign out and thanked them for their time. Literally seconds later I was sighted by Joe Z. and a few members from the club. The first words were out of Joe’s mouth mouth were “ We found you” accompanied by a slap on the back, and nervous smiles from the others.

A few jokes of wandering into alleys and how I could have been mugged were thrown into the mix and we made our way back to the bus, which was in the same location that it had dropped me off and was only about a five minute walk from my location on Canal Street. I have no shame in saying I had been walking on the same patch of road for about forty five minutes (Well maybe a little). I asked a girl from Geneseo who was attending what they has seen in the last hour and a half, they said that they had been looking for me the whole time. Jackie DiBella had called the college as well and I later learned that they were about to call the police. I could not help but feel a pang of guilt. The entire time they had been looking for a kid that couldn’t tell the time from his toenails so I quietly sat back in my seat. This had happened to me before with my family in other cities due to a lack in communication but my family usually trusted me to meet them when I meet them but I felt terrible to have everyone so frayed and worried.

The rest of the trip had been thrown by an hour and so was our time in the city. Despite this, the rest of the tour was quite fun and a bit intriguing as well. Steve told stories about his favorite restaurants, how he’s bumped into many celebrities over the years and battles between George Westfield and JP Morgan over electrical outlets. The educational worth was only outweighed by entrainment value. A view of Times Square, Indian dance performers, regular street performers, and a man dressed in a costume of Woody from Toy Story laid the icing on this metaphorical cake.

The last thing I can note, in beauty and in design would be the Brooklyn Bridge after dark. Immaculate and formidable this was the Atheistic Helen of Troy of the trip, for me. My phone had ran out of power from wandering and I took my photos from the bus. We rounded the bridge just one more time for me to get some photos, and I caught some shots just as we left back to town in Batavia.

It was a fun trip regardless of the long time to get there, ambling around vendors from another world, and the melancholy of the museum. Everything had a counterbalance, like with the solemn allure of the museum, the festive air of an NYC festival, or the care of my fellow club members, there was something that made the trip memorable, in a funny off kilter sort of way. I advise anyone and everyone to join this amiable, intriguing club. I haven’t talked to many of the members myself due to my escapade, and would love to meet you there. The next meeting is on Monday, October 6th in T102 from 5:00-6:30pm. There is a cost to join but you can’t be turned away because there is grant money. I hear there will be pizza if any is interested. But remember, the real privilege of this group is its company.

GCC Art Exhibit Revealed

10521051_567169013387993_5907130954713291898_o
Standard

From all the new things here I bet viewing art is the top priority on your list, right?  No?  To the freshmen and other newbies that have came here I suggest giving it a shot. The exhibit is high quality, took years to produce and will give you more than just an experience viewing nice pictures, with notices on the walls to find how some were made, and why most of the photographs have a man, standing alone, with an orange cap in them.

The grand opening was back on September 11th where I watched over a dozen people help themselves to melted sherbet juice, and an assortment of cookies, in formal dresses to dress shirts, all engaged in pleasant conversation.  The art gallery here has some kind of following!  Its pleasantly surprising, and caught me off guard.  The exhibits focus on various faculty artists.  I’m not surprised the last, and perhaps the largest, showing was the photos from a professor Joe Z.  Adviser to the photography club and traveling artist.  He was able to tell me about the photos that came from Tonowanda to Okinawa.  This project started two years ago when he asked for the funds to be able to travel, and since then  has brought the grand opening in the paper, and been taking artists statements for this.  He has been doing this since 1988, and the quality of work is something that I can’t deny, even as a noobile art critic, is incredible.  He invites any and all who have an interest in the arts to join the photography club, even if photography or art is not the profession they’re seeking, including me.  You may have missed the drinks and cookies but this is only the first act.

I bet you’re wondering then, ” Well I missed the event.  What now?”.  Joe plans no new art exhibits in the near distant future but when I asked how could anybody get involved with art on campus, or in the area, he told me a few places to stop by.  The first is the Goart.org, which is held by the Genesee-Orleans regional arts council.  You can donate on the page or involve yourself with any of their activities locally.  The place has a gallery posted up, but you need to schedule an appointment from 9-4 from Monday to Friday.  It’s a bit classy.  If that doesn’t hit anything, how about art Fridays?  Look up first Fridays for Rochester and Buffalo on the almighty google.  Every first friday of the month some art shows and activities are held at local galleries at each city.  The best part is that it’s free.  The last is the Allen Street Art Festival where there is sure to be food, crafts and good time, that is though when it actually shows.  The festival is a yearly event so keep your eyes peeled for that one.

Even though I’ve only been here for little over three weeks, I can tell the people here are kind and dedicated to their arts and crafts (forgive the pun).  In all seriousness though, show up sometime to the Roz Steiner gallery or anything else around here.  It really is a rare gem on campus and as Joe said ” It’s really nice to see young people here.”

Homecoming: Alumni Road Kicks Off Thursday

alumniroad2 copy
Standard

This week is homecoming and GCC is gearing up for a Beatles themed celebration, transforming Abby Road to Alumni Road. The weekend will start out early with a Homecoming Rally on Thursday, September 25th at 1pm in the Gym. Come and cheer on our teams with and stay for a special performance by the Cougarettes.

Friday, September 26th

“Come Together” during our Happier Hour event in the Theater Lobby from 5-8pm. The event will feature a Meet n’ Greet with GCC’s Charter Alumni Council, KC Sunshine Entertainment, Beatles Trivia & prizes and a cash bar.

At 6pm, our next event begins with “Yesterday.” This event will be located in the Stadium and is a Women’s Alumni Soccer Game.

The Men’s Alumni Soccer Game is entitled, “Get Back” and will also be held in the Stadium. The event begins at 7:45pm.

Saturday, September 27th

This fun filled day starts off at 8:30am with “Day Tripper,” where anyone can register and pick up their packets for the “FUN” Raising our Future 5k Run/Walk. This event is held in the Gym. To preregister for the 5k, please visit http://www.gccfoundation.kinteraorg/5k.

“The Long and Winding Road” will begin at 10am. Our 5K Run/Fun Walk for Genesee Community College Student Scholarships raises money for student scholarships and offers a great opportunity for you to reconnect with your colleagues and friends.

“Good Day Sunshine,” (my daughter’s favorite song) also begins at 10am in the Stadium with a Men’s Alumni Lacrosse game.

After the 5k is over, get by with “A Little Help From My Friends” at 11:30 in the Cafeteria. There will be refreshments and awards for best group costumes and more.

Follow “Penny Lane” from 12-2pm for an event filled with family orientated activities. During this time in The Forum, there will be popcorn and apple cider, a bounce house, arts and crafts, face painting, a balloon man, and the Genesee County Sheriff’s Department will be available to speak to families about child safety.

“Drive My Car” also begins at Noon in the GCC parking lot. This will be our Car & Bike Super Cruise where everyone can enjoy classic cars and motorcycles and students  are able to raise money for their clubs and organizations. During this event, don’t forget to pick up your Pulled Pork BBQ lunch! Lunches will be available from 11-2pm and are available for pick-up in the side lawn by the car cruise.

Later in the evening, you can continue to help student scholarships by buying your Oktober Brew Fest tickets in advance on our website. The GCC Foundation that funds student scholarships receives $5 from every presale ticket sold from our website. There will also be tickets available at the door. The Brew Fest is held at the Batavia Downs by the Genesee County Rotary and will run from 6:30-9:30pm. The first 500 people in attendance will receive a commemorative glass and a $10 free play for Batavia Downs. There will be beer and wine tastings, munchies, and live entertainment.

For an up-to-date list on all of the events happening during Alumni Road, please visit our website.

Twelve Week Courses Start Monday!

Standard

ChristineHenley:

Check out the classes that are still available as 12 week courses starting Monday! Register NOW!

Originally posted on MaryJane's Weblog:

twelveIt’s not to late to register for 12 week courses that start on Monday (September 22). There’s a pretty wide variety of courses open at this point:

  • BUS 110 – Personal Money Management
  • CEP 101 – Career & Educational Planning
  • CRJ 122 – Intro Emergency Management
  • FPT 101 – Intro to Food Processing Tech
  • HUR 101 – Human Relations 1 (Warsaw)
  • LIT 213 – Science Fiction (Online)
  • MUS 203 – Hist Rock & Roll: Blues & Beyond (Albion)

Of course, 12 week courses are faster paced than the full semester course, but nowhere near as fast as an 8 week class — and there are a bunch of those starting on October 20. More about those later!

This is an opportunity to talk to an adviser, especially if you’re kind of drowning in one of your courses. You can get out of that going-to-be-awful course and into something…

View original 84 more words

Zyla Adds a Pop of Color to GCC

David Zyla pictured with GCC Fashion Students
Standard

On Wednesday September 17th, GCC had the pleasure of hosting Emmy-award-winning stylist and author, David Zyla, as a guest speaker. When he walked into the room, Zyla had this energy about him. There’s something special about having a guest speaker who is just as excited to be in attendance as the audience. David Zyla kept listeners intrigued with his relatable anecdotes and fashion-industry insights.

A very accomplished individual, it is clear that David Zyla has worked hard to achieve everything that he has earned. He is an author of two books (Color Your Style and How to Win At Shopping) and a 2010 Emmy Award recipient in the category of Outstanding Achievement in Costume Design for All My Children. Raised in New Hartford, New York, and a student of the prestigious Tisch School of the Arts at NYU, Zyla has always been a man who is motivated by style. David revealed to the audience that one experience he had in particular at a young age was a defining moment in the beginnings of his fashion career. His parents had been getting ready for a dinner party, and Zyla told his mother to wear a certain necklace. He then continued to advise his father to put together a not-so-obvious outfit combination. It was this seemingly small moment in which David Zyla had discovered his aptitude for design. David pursued his interest in fashion by studying costume design at NYU. It was there that he demonstrated his natural eye for stylistic expression. However, he soon discovered that he needed to learn the reason why behind things would appear to look well together. Zyla credits a friend for what made him pursue the study of color theory stating that, “someone being completely straightforward with you can change your life.” That is exactly what happened in David Zyla’s case; from there he “fell” into his own fashion label, and his since progressed into multiple realms of the fashion industry.

David Zyla speaking at GCC

David Zyla speaking at GCC

Zyla went on to discuss what he knows best: color. He advised the audience by saying, “Think about color as a raw material to showcase you.” David warned against following blindly and flaunting the pantone color palettes released seasonally. Alternatively he told listeners to, “illuminate yourself with your true colors.” He taught the audience how to find their specific color combinations by observing different parts of their bodies, such as the eyes, hair, and skin. One specific color tip Zyla gave was to wear your “dramatic color” on an interview in order to leave a lasting impression. This can be found by observing the vein color on your inner wrist.

David Zyla was a charismatic and personable speaker; he took the opportunity to point out many of the audience members’ outfits and why they fit their color personas. He pointed me out in particular as well and complimented my jacket stating that it was my “essence color”. Zyla also answered a variety of questions posed by audience members and GCC students. Sophomore Fashion Merchandising student, Ariana, asked, “do you have an end-all-be-all favorite color?” Zyla responded by saying, “I can’t have color bias, I am open to all colors.” But when considering further, he stated that he loves the connotation of sunshine yellow and everything it stands for. Sophomore design student, Amber, asked David if he had any advice for students involved with the production of the 34th annual fashion show at GCC. Zyla responded by saying, “Lady Gaga performs,” the audience had a burst of intermittent laughter, “ the concept is great; for the concepts within the show find ten words to describe your theme, find a touchstone. The minute you say to yourself that I need to be more [blank] then you’re in trouble.”

David Zyla signing a student's program.

David Zyla signing a student’s program.

Zyla offered a versatile depth of advice for both fashion students and anyone interested in the science behind color and style. I would like to take the opportunity to thank everyone who was involved in the planning of this event, and David Zyla himself for taking the time out of his busy schedule to come speak at GCC; it was truly a colorful experience.

You can follow David on Twitter @DavidZylaStyle as well as Facebook.

Emmy Winning Stylist Coming to GCC

DavidZyla
Standard

Ever wonder what color red looks best on you? David Zyla can help you know. Don’t miss a chance to hear the Emmy-winning stylist and author speak at Genesee Community College on Wednesday, September 17, 2014 at 1:00 p.m. in Room T102 of the Conable Technology Building on the GCC Batavia campus. His talk is part of The Fall Fashion Speakers Series at GCC. Zyla will be available for press interviews and photographs 30 minutes prior to his presentation in the Rosalie “Roz” Steiner Art Gallery in the Genesee Center for the Arts.

Zyla believes “every person has the right to feel empowered and look fantastic.” He helps people discover their individual palette of flattering colors found by looking at tones in the eyes, hair and skin. “By honoring and wearing these colors…we not only illuminate ourselves, but we build the confidence needed to attract love, enhance our power, restore our energy, make a lasting impression and show the world who we really are,” he writes on his website, www.davidzyla.com.

Zyla started out in fashion design, launching his own Seventh Avenue label at the age of 22. In 2001, ABC hired him to reinvigorate the visual quality of daytime television. He was head costume designer for General Hospital, Port Charles and All My Children for which he received an Emmy Award in 2010 for Outstanding Achievement in Costume Design. He has also designed for commercials and film as well as Broadway shows and regional theatre productions. He has worked with well-known personalities, including Susan Lucci, Carol Burnett, Tom Hanks and Hillary Clinton.

Zyla is the author of “The Color of Style” and “Color Your Style.” His new book “How to Win at Shopping” is due out in January.

For further information, contact Donna Rae Sutherland, associate director of Marketing Communications at (585) 343-0055 x 6616 or dsutherland@genesee.edu.

Organization Leads to Success

Standard

I was not the organizing type before I made my return to GCC last fall. I quickly learned that I had to get organized fast. In high school, I was never organized because every teacher wanted you to organize differently and this had me confused and unorganized. Everyone has their own way of getting organized so I picked the best ways to get organized according to my needs. By the end of week one of Fall 2013 I devised a plan and stuck to it. To my surprise, it worked! Here’s how I organized my academic life:

Time Management

A major factor of being able to stay organized is time management. I don’t like to be rushed so I have to schedule my life. Everything is so much easier when my bag is packed the night before, coffee’s ready in the morning and outfits are laid out and ready to wear. I’ve also found that if I plan out specific times to write that paper or study for the big test then I will actually do it. This is where Google Calendar and my weekly planner are extra helpful. The GCC Career Service Center will be hosting a Time Management Workshop from 12:45-1:45 on Tuesday, September 23. For more information and to register for the workshop please visit our website. I’ll be going because there isn’t a time management tip I’m not ready embrace. Join me!!

My Weekly Planner

I like multifunctional things so it’s only fitting that I found a three in one organizer. I have a zippered pocket for pens and highlighters, a notebook and a pocket for business cards and other loose items. Each week, I made a to do list and crossed items off as I finished them.

Online Organization

I am a Google fanatic. Gmail is a must and, in my opinion, a far more professional email platform. Google Drive is Google’s version of “the cloud” where you can store your Google Docs, Sheets, Drawings, pictures, and other Google and Microsoft Office Apps. You are allowed 15 gigabytes for free and, if you have a Gmail account, you have a Google Drive. I use Google Drive and Docs to type up all of my homework and papers. It’s a simple way to have everything you need in one place without a thumb drive. The last way I stay organized online is with Google Calendar. At the beginning of each month I sit down and make events for every homework, test, and appointment. This way I’m reminded via email (and push notification on my phone) that something is due or I have somewhere to be.

Class Notes and Handouts:

Many of my classes had their powerpoints posted on Blackboard. I made sure to have them printed out and ready to go. I chose the option that lets you print three slides on one half of the paper and three spaces for notes. I kept separate two pocket folders for each class so I could keep the powerpoints and handouts exactly where I needed them. Finally I used a three subject notebook for the classes that didn’t have powerpoints available on Blackboard. I made sure to take great lecture notes and even better book notes to ensure success in each and every class.


School Locker

One thing I truly dislike is carrying all my stuff around all day long. So I decided to rent a locker for the year from Student Activities. Its only $30 for the year or $15 for a semester and you get a portion of your money back at the end of the year. I loved being able to drop nearly everything off at my locker before classes. A locker at GCC is a must.

So there you have it. That is how I organized my academic life. Check out our Pinterest board about getting ready for classes for more organization tips. Do you have any tips or tricks of your own?