Boo Ball, a Night of Fright Around the Corner.

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It’s the time of year where you don old costumes, pull out the excess rolls of toilet paper (to clean up parties), and lament the absence of the great pumpkin. Wax hands hasn’t stolen the creepiest thing for this month at GCC. Of course I’m speaking about Boo Ball. Now you can’t go around pranking anyone, so you may ask where are the scares. The scary thing is that you’ll actually help someone if you party at this event. The price of admission, and yes there is one, will cost you a dollar or one canned good. They send the food to the homeless here in the area, where I assume there are not as many awesome Harry Potter themed parties.

The theme of this year’s Boo Ball is in fact Harry Potter. Yes, you too can release your repressed inner nerd in this costume based eve of frivolity, which will leave some of us in tears, for better or for worse. Despite whatever dissension you think I follow I’ll set the record straight; I think it’s gonna be awesome, and this is with fandoms likes, and background aside. There are only a few of these dances in the near distant future, and for the overall year the amount is slimmer still. If you want the chance to participate then I personally invite you as a member of CAB supporting this thing.

If I have peaked your interest then allow me to sate your voracious mind, and the questions I know are bubbling in your brain. This event will have more than just dancing planned, we’ll have food for the hungry, the college students, and potions for the venturous. But we have more than just food and drink. Attend and you will learn that the college village members have been assigned a house corresponding to the their residency, oh, and there will be games. If you fancy yourself a dueler, a match may clear your head; if perhaps you have some Felix Felecis, and desire a chance to sport your luck, then partaking in the scavenger hunt is in order. However, even I can’t tell what fate awaits the winning house, and only time will tell the victors prize; and it surely awaits in candy, and glory.

For those who don’t want to pay then maybe some work will do the trick. The event could use volunteers to make this thing stand out, and of course you’d meet the men and women behind the scenes. Everyone at CAB has a heart of gold, and the price to pay, of time and effort, you’re rewarded with a company of those with the heart to hold all these college events, and the skill to organize them. If you can donate and volunteer you would be a hero in my eyes, and I am sure those you’d help would too.

The games and fright is on ghosts and ghouls, and I would be delighted to see any of you there that fateful night, to sit a spell, or show your dance moves. This event will be fun, and from what I know there will be enough sweets to satisfy your palate; you’ll gain your dollars worth of entry: that, I guarantee. Have some fun, share some laughs, and enjoy the Harry Potter themed madness. Halloween comes only once a year, so I always make the best of it. I hope to see you at the Boo Ball on Thursday, October 30th from 8-12pm.

Friends Don’t Let Friends-Date Friends

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Rhonda Parker has been making films since she was 17 years old, but much of her life is invested in a full-length feature she’s just completed as part of an Honors Program project at Genesee Community College. The movie, “Friends Don’t Let Friends – Date Friends” will debut at a VIP dinner and a movie night at the Bald Eagle Bistro, 1033 S. Lakeland Beach Rd. in Kendall on Friday, November 7, 2014 at 7 pm. Seating is limited to 50. Presale tickets are $25 and, if there’s room, $30 at the door. Tickets are available on the movie’s website, www.friendsdontletfriendsdatefriends.com, at which you can also view a trailer of the romantic comedy.

Parker is a paralegal and communications/media arts student at GCC. She expects to graduate in December 2014. Besides being an Honors Program student, she’s been a blogger for the College and also won an essay contest sponsored by The Historical Society of the New York Courts, about which Professor Charles Scruggs said “Her acerbic wit, frequently on display in class, is used to good effect in her written work.”

That wit is evident in “Friends…” which Parker describes as a “highly fictionalized account of actual events.” The main character, played by former GCC student Amelia Favata of Canandaigua, is a version of Parker herself. “It’s a very timeless story based on people I hung out with in my youth. It’s been in my head for 20 years. I started writing it 15 years ago and have revised it several times. Seven years ago it went through a peer review on [Francis Ford Coppola’s] Zoetrope.com.” So far, test audiences have enjoyed it. “One friend said of the film ‘I had forgotten…that’s what it feels like to fall in love.’”

Though Parker has written and produced a number of short films, and appeared as a “Walmart mom” in a commercial, this is the first time she held auditions for a movie. “It broke my heart to turn people away,” she said. Several current and former GCC students appear in the film. They shot the film over seven weekends at locations in and around Parker’s hometown of Albion. Because it is an Honors Program project, she was able to utilize equipment from GCC including camera, tripod, and lights.

Her husband, Mark Parker, completed editing the film at their home with Sony Vegas Pro software. “He’s the editor and I’m the editor-in-chief,” Parker explains. “He’s the doer, and I’m the thinker.”

Parker has been thinking a lot about how to get the word out about her film. “My goal is to have everyone in America see this movie,” she said. Beyond the dinner and a movie debut, she has lined up a number of additional screenings.

GCC Video/Telecommunications Director Barry Chow, with whom Parker completed an independent study, is sponsoring a show in the Stuart Steiner Theatre at GCC on Sunday, November 9, 2014 at 2:45 pm with a reception to follow. General admission is $8; students and seniors, $6.

The Buffalo Dreams Fantastic Film Festival will show the film at 7:00 pm on Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014 at the Eastern Hills Cinema in Williamsville. Several other screenings are planned in Medina, Amherst, and Batavia. Check the film’s facebook page for more information: https://www.facebook.com/events/558510764281947/.

The Honors Program at GCC encourages independent, creative, and interdisciplinary study through academic work of depth, originality, and quality. Parker is more than pleased with her Honors experience and the film overall. “It’s like watching your dreams come true right in front of your eyes,” she said. She hopes the film’s success leads to more moviemaking for her. “That’s exactly what I want to do. I have a lot of scripts in my head.”

#GCCINNYC

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Wednesday October 8th rushed in like the cool breeze that the morning brought with it. As the large capacity bus pulled up to section E in the GCC parking lot, everyone waited anxiously with their plethora of bags. Only one bag would be carried by the hotel’s bell service in New York City, but it was clear that everyone was willing to make the sacrifice of lugging multiple bags for the sake of fashion. Around seven hours, and a stop at Subway later, the fashion students of GCC had arrived in the heart of midtown Manhattan.

Christine Furmanek and Ami Cornell with the P.R. Director of Buffalo David Bitton, Diane Alexander.

Christine Furmanek and Ami Cornell with the PR Director of Buffalo David Bitton, Diane Alexander.

The very next day, we all trekked to the Buffalo David Bitton showrooms. This trip was one of the opportunities that I had been anticipating the most. I had hoped to take the opportunity to network with Diane Alexander, the PR Director of Buffalo, as well as visualize the direction of the upcoming Spring/Summer 2015 collection. Diane was one of the most entertaining presenters that I had the chance to meet all week. From her hilarious anecdotes about difficult celebrities, who shall go unnamed, to her candid persona, Diane certainly sells the Buffalo image. She shared with us the story of how one man by the name of Nik Wallenda, famed high wire artist, became one of Buffalo’s best brand representatives after stating that he wore Buffalo jeans while crossing the Grand Canyon on a high wire. Diane clearly knows the fashion industry, and therefore has an endless amount of knowledge and stories to share. Christine Furmanek and I also had the opportunity to connect with Diane directly after she described her love of bloggers due to their easy-going nature. I served as the Project Manager for the trip, and was responsible for presenting Diane with a Genesee Community College branded umbrella, after which she had told us that she is obsessed with the umbrellas we bring her annually. FullSizeRender (5)Later in the presentation, students had the opportunity to ask Diane questions. When I asked her how she would describe the “Buffalo man or woman,” Diane responded by describing their target customer as an eighteen to twenty-four-year-old man or woman who is looking for a great fashion denim at a reasonable price. Diane pointed out that their male customers are steadfast and will often wear the same style of jean every year, making them repeat customers. Buffalo is certainly a brand that is on the move, they are constantly evolving and perfecting their image. Be on the lookout for their Summer 2015 collection, Buffalo will introduce fun prints, colors on the cooler end of the color spectrum, and styles that emulate boho vibes.

IMG_8649After we finished our trip to Buffalo David Bitton showrooms, the fashion business students walked a few blocks south to The Doneger Group. While at the Doneger Group we had the opportunity to meet Liz Lettieri, Trend Services Manager, and Michelle Rotbart, Trend Analyst. Liz’s job is to introduce products into the market and sell them, while Michelle develops all of the trend concept books for Doneger. At Doneger we were shown a variety of color and style forecasting reports that many major retailers within the U.S. pay thousands to see. The experience we had at Doneger was very interesting due to the fact that the depth of forecasting we were able to view was a side of the fashion industry that often goes unseen and unexplained. A major takeaway that I had from the Doneger Group experience was that color never changes completely, it evolves from season to season. When thought about in that light, it becomes easier to understand how different color palettes become within trend based on the season.

GCC student Lekha Anderson with Michelle of The Doneger Group.

GCC student Lekha Anderson with Michelle of The Doneger Group.

Michelle closed the presentation by stating that if you’re interested in trend, you should be interested in knowing everything, because trends encompass all aspects of life.Visiting Doneger was an unforgettable experience, and a rare one at that, I left the building wanting to know more.

I feel fortunate to have had the opportunity to visit both Buffalo David Bitton and the Doneger Group. Opportunities like these do not come around often, but thanks to the excellent connections that we’ve all been presented with at Genesee Community College, this was all possible. Fashion is constantly on the move here at GCC so be on the lookout for there is more to come!

Shine The Light on Domestic Violence

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October is Domestic Violence awareness Month and on Wednesday, October 15th, all seven campus locations will participate in a one-day project aimed to Shine the Light on domestic violence through a number of purple themed initiatives. The organizers of the events hope to use the color purple to bring awareness to the suffering victims endure at the hands of loved ones. This is the third year of GCC’s THINK PURPLE campaign.

From 9:00am to 4:00pm, information tables will be set up in the Forum highlighting the YWCA Domestic Violence Program, RESTORE Rape Crisis Services, GCC Counseling and Campus Safety. Purple t-shirts emblazoned with “GCC Supports…Paws Off” will be sold for $5, with the proceeds benefiting the Genesee County Domestic Violence Program. Students from the Student Health Awareness Group, the Alpha Epsilon Gamma service organization, GCC Cheer and Dance Team and GCC Ambassadors will distribute neon purple glow bracelets and will ask participants to snap the bracelet and take a moment to think about victims of domestic violence.

The ‘Clothesline Project’ will be featured on the Forum stage for viewing and survivors and supporters are offered the opportunity to create their own shirt. GCC’s campus radio station, WGCC 90.7 FM will join the event to interview students and help spread the word about domestic violence. Once dusk settles in, GCC’s clock tower will be illuminated with purple lights in order to follow the lead of the SUNY Administration Building’s campaign to bring awareness to domestic violence victims.

Earlier this month, Harmony Reid came to speak to students about her experience with domestic violence. Reid struggled with depression, alcoholism and PTSD after she was raped during her first semester at college and later became a victim of domestic violence. Reid tells her story because she hopes to help people become aware of and prevent domestic violence. Reid declared:

We need to stop victims from being victims.

If you or someone you know is a victim of domestic violence, please speak up and reach out for help. The YWCA of Genesee County is able to help women with crisis intervention information, referral services, safety planning, shelter, court assistance, supportive counseling, advocacy, and other services. The Genesee County YWCA phone number is 585-343-5808 and the 24 hour domestic violence hotline is 585-343-7513.

A New Point Of View

My First Window Display At Charles Men's Shop.
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Charles Men’s shop is a family owned and operated business that has been Batavia’s number one choice for fine men’s clothing since the store’s creation in 1947. The store has an excellent reputation within the local community, as well as within Genesee Community College. For these reasons, I was explicitly overjoyed when offered the opportunity to intern as a visual merchandising coordinator at Charles Men’s Shop. I considered this a great opportunity to improve my skills within designing window displays, as I am set to take the visual display class in the next eight-week session at GCC.

Maggie's First Window Display at Charles Men's Shop.

Maggie’s First Window Display at Charles Men’s Shop.

Before going into set up my first window display I had very little experience doing any task of this kind. I was terrified of failing or of letting anyone down. I researched hours-upon-hours, looking at different color palettes popular for fall menswear, as well as observing a variety of window displays online. I took advice from anywhere I could get it; I was told to find a theme or direction in order to make the execution of my vision easier. I also spoke to Maggie, a current freshman in the Fashion Business Merchandising program at GCC, and current visual merchandising intern at Charles Men’s Shop. Maggie had told me that her first window theme would center around indoor fall theming which she phrased as, “Antiqued fall elegance.” Maggie captured her vision perfectly within her window space.

I however took an alternate route. I executed a theme inspired by the outdoor beauty of fall and the sense of community it can create through local sporting events and other active interests. I received a plethora of support and guidance from the Men’s shop staff, Kristen and Don, as well as from my fashion professors, Professor Dudkowski and Professor Ehrhart. I was appreciative of any constructive criticism or suggestions they had for me, as I felt lost in this brand new world. I’m still finding my way when it comes to creating displays for Charles Men’s Shop; recently I took on the task of creating a table display as well.

My First Table Display at Charles Men's Shop.

My First Table Display at Charles Men’s Shop.

Though I find this job to be challenging, I am interested and excited to strengthen valuable and necessary skill-sets within myself. If it were not for the excellent professors and connections I have access to at Genesee Community College I may never had earned an opportunity of this caliber. I am incredibly grateful to have this chance to grow, and cannot wait to see where this opportunity takes me in the not-so-far future.

Coming Soon: #GCCINNYC

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In less than a week I will be accompanying the fashion students of Genesee Community College, as well as anyone else interested in expanding the horizons of their knowledge of the fashion business, to one of the largest fashion capitals in the world, New York City. This annual trip to NYC has become a rite of passage for many of the fashion students at GCC, and for good reason. Professor Dudkowski and Professor Ehrhart, the resident Fashion Business program professors, are networking experts. Both of them have a never-ending list of contacts that spans continents, ensuring that each yearly trip to NYC is filled with unique and once-in-a-lifetime experiences in the fashion world. This trip is no exception. After spending a fun-filled day solo in the city on Wendesday October 8th, we will all rise early on Thursday morning in order to visit the John Varvatos showrooms. John Varvatos is an American contemporary menswear designer. He was the recipient of the CFDA: Menswear Designer of the Year award in both 2001 and 2005, he was also the winner of the Perry Ellis Award for menswear in 2000, and in 2007 he was named the designer of the year by GQ. This type of visit should not be experienced lightly, very few people get to step foot into this showroom, let alone tour it. We will then have the opportunity to visit Buffalo David Bitton Showrooms and receive a tour by PR Director, Diane Alexander.

Last spring students in the fashion program at GCC received a box of clothing from Buffalo David Bitton's Spring 2014 line.

Last spring students in the fashion program at GCC received a box of clothing from Buffalo David Bitton’s Spring 2014 line.

As many readers of the GCC blog may remember, the college has a special relationship with Buffalo David Bitton. Last year students studying in the GCC fashion program were sent items from the new Buffalo David Bitton spring 2014 line in order to be used in the 33rd Annual fashion show, Ethereal, at Genesee Community College. The Buffalo David Bitton company launched in Canada in 1985 as a womenswear and menswear label and now sells to prestigious stores such as Macy’s and Bloomingdales. Their product line has been endorsed by a variety of A-list celebrities including Christina Aguilera, Halle Berry, and Brad Pitt, just to name a few. After we experience the rare opportunity of browsing these showrooms, the Fashion Business Merchandising students will split from the Fashion Design students. The Fashion Design students will visit Mood designer fabrics, the number-one shopping destination for fashion fabric in the world; Mood is now a household name amongst anyone on the hunt for high quality fabrics due to the popular reality TV show, Project Runway. At this point the fashion business merchandising students will visit The Doneger Group, the fashion industry’s leading source of global trend intelligence, focused merchandising direction, expert analysis of the retail business, and comprehensive market information.

Anthony M. Urmey of LIM speaking to fashion students

Anthony M. Urmey of LIM speaking to fashion students

On the morning of Friday, October 10th, everyone on the trip will have the opportunity to visit LIM and meet with Mr. Anthony Urmey, Admissions and Transfer Services Counselor. Urmey visited GCC last spring in order to inform prospective students who were hoping to transfer to LIM about financial aid and scholarship programs. We will also have the chance to hear two GCC alumni speak at this event.

David Zyla speaking at GCC

David Zyla speaking at GCC

Later that evening Emmy Award-winning stylist, Best-Selling author, and recent GCC keynote speaker, David Zyla, will be hosting a Fashion Speak Friday event on the topic of men’s neckties. The head haberdashery designer of Ralph Lauren along with the 90’s necktie giant, Gene Meyer, will be at this event as well. This will be a great chance for all students to network with influential people working in fashion; design students will also have the opportunity to sketch models after the show.

Saturday, October 11th, will conclude the trip, and begin our journey home to GCC. We will all return with a superior understanding and appreciation of the fashion business that we can apply to our individual programs of study, and ultimately assist us in the production of the 34th annual fashion show at Genesee Community College.

Be on the lookout for updates from the resident bloggers of the trip, and view instant updates on Twitter and Instagram under the hashtag #GCCINNYC .

A Day In The Big Apple: Seeing Ground Zero, and Running Around In Chinatown.

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With a woman saying nice to meet you to everyone, the start of the journey began. Well, not really I can safely say that it began in my dormitory the night before when I contacted the adviser to the project Jackie DiBella. Who told me with a document that I would have to wake and get to the bus to the station by 4:30 in the morning, and there was a party, loud and unstoppable, only a few halls down. We have three officers on board and I was too slow at the keyboard in order to type down, Gary and Larry were the two bus drivers that ran the expedition. Meeting the tour director would occur at NYC. The speech ending with “sit back and relax” I had just been roused out a of a sound sleep at three am in the morning, yet I was still stoked to go, and felt that there was nothing that could go wrong in any way, shape, or from here.

We drove for six hours, and after an eternity made our way to Zuccotti Park, where I accomplished one of my childhood dreams. I had my first slice of NYC pizza. You have not lived until you have has a slice at NYC. The park itself held a protest against Wall Street at that park a few years ago. And after the lunch we headed straight to the museum.

It really started with s going to the ground zero memorial exhibit, where we split up independently to view it. The entrance was well fortified by metal detectors, armed guards, and lengthy security procedures. The hall beyond led into a huge foyer, and just inside the museum, the first sight gripped me. There were glass panels, and not ordinary. They somehow had projectors that made it so words would be produced in the shape of North America, in every language I could think of. They towered at least ten feet tall, and they were arranged in such a pattern that the whole of the U.S could only be seen from an angle at the beginning of the tour.

I saw the size of something called “the last pillar” before I even entered the exhibit which was about, in diameter, as long as I am and extended from the ground to the highest points of the trade center before it was destroyed. Its base served a reminder to the grandeur of this titan, and the rest of what was left had been signed by family members of those who had died there, and moved to a location I didn’t know. There was one last exhibit titled, “Trying To Remember the Color of the Sky on That September Morning,” before the major exhibit itself, where dozens if not hundreds of different hues and shades of blue silhouetted against a wall that was around twenty feet tall, and maybe fifty feet or so wide. Some words staunchly peered against it in lead, gray writing saying:

No day shall erase you from the memory of time.

I scoured the museum in search of something memorable, and I found it: I did not suspect it to be so emotional. The museum itself held a collection of audio files of those that had been in the fires before they died, and memorabilia from that moment. I can not show you what truly went on in the actual center, but perhaps I can give you a small glimpse. Twisted metal, broken concrete, police badges, broken fire fighter helmets, bandannas, backpacks, notes, and quotes of those transcribed upon the wall for all to see. It was the stories that weren’t told in high school are what struck me. Stories like a civilian running in the debris with a red bandana, saving anyone he could in the wreckage, and his body showing not too long after. Or how a man called his little girl at 8:59, and then 9:00 am saying things like “ I think were safe in this building,” and “ It’s terrible. It’s terrible,” are the things I can’t shake from my mind. Along with a memorial to what it was before this and every manner of dedication to it after it was obliterated, my mindset focused on how it would have been like to be there. I saw paintings, wreathes, and posters to the sites history, before and after; even a comic by marvel for it, appropriately named “Heroes”.

There were ways to involve if you wanted to leave your mark there. You could leave a signature for the archives and a quote for future generations to stare on what you had left behind. There was also a room in which you could record statements of how you thought this was important to remember, or how everything has changed in the last several years since that day. I signed up for both the recording and the signature. Maybe you will see my name and the words “I was not there, but I will remember.” on one of the digital plaques, or hear my recording.

After an hour of us students walking alone, we finally assembled into a mass with the help of some coordinating from Jackie and our tour guide Steve. We had some stragglers and were waiting for about fifteen minutes. I promised then and there, outside near the shinning pools of the memorial, that I would not leave the side of the group, and work to my utmost capability to prevent myself from getting lost.

We toured a little more, jay-walked past a small army of cops in broad sight, and took a view of the legendary Statue of Liberty, and even saw Ellis Island not far behind. We traveled around the city for not much longer and then made our way past Broadway and deeper into the Lower East Side of Manhattan.

We had stopped by Chinatown, the home of “Rolex” watches, and “Prada” bags, and although I wasn’t much of a shopper, this was Chinatown in NYC! Suffice to say I was bouncing out of my chair when the tour guide said. “Hey you guys want to go shopping around here?” And I was the first one out. Somehow I had got it through my brain that he said, “show at the corner of Canal and Mulberry street in Little Italy. You’ll be able to tell by the Neon sign. Not show at blah, blah, blah.” I thought I heard 5:45 but I heard him say 6:45 at one point too, thank you lack of sleep. And so, I marched into the throngs of the metropolis, where I bought a cool hat and a few knick knacks for me and my folks, huzzah! I even got a few pictures of the San Gennaro Festival at Little Italy. But this was was short lived, I showed at the place I thought I was supposed to show, and no one was there. I hastily checked my phone and, of course, there was no power. I was stuck in one of the largest cities in the world, and had no way of contacting anyone that could get me out. So I did what any sane, rational human being would do: I started running up to strangers and asked if I could take their phones for just a second. Well, I wasn’t that harsh, but the looks I was given suggested so; personally I don’t blame them, someone asking to email someone does sound odd, not dangerous but odd. After about an hour of struggle, talking to police officers about if there was a library in a ten mile radius, and a visit to Starbucks where I failed in acquiring a usb cord, I found a kind woman, with who I assumed is her boyfriend, who agreed to help me out. She gave me her phone for a second, while I kept saying they could do it themselves, since trusting a strange kid with a weird story is kind of unheard of. I messed with her phone for about five minutes while her much taller and stronger than me bodyguard/boyfriend stood watching me like I was a poisonous serpent. I then tapped the button for sign out and thanked them for their time. Literally seconds later I was sighted by Joe Z. and a few members from the club. The first words were out of Joe’s mouth mouth were “ We found you” accompanied by a slap on the back, and nervous smiles from the others.

A few jokes of wandering into alleys and how I could have been mugged were thrown into the mix and we made our way back to the bus, which was in the same location that it had dropped me off and was only about a five minute walk from my location on Canal Street. I have no shame in saying I had been walking on the same patch of road for about forty five minutes (Well maybe a little). I asked a girl from Geneseo who was attending what they has seen in the last hour and a half, they said that they had been looking for me the whole time. Jackie DiBella had called the college as well and I later learned that they were about to call the police. I could not help but feel a pang of guilt. The entire time they had been looking for a kid that couldn’t tell the time from his toenails so I quietly sat back in my seat. This had happened to me before with my family in other cities due to a lack in communication but my family usually trusted me to meet them when I meet them but I felt terrible to have everyone so frayed and worried.

The rest of the trip had been thrown by an hour and so was our time in the city. Despite this, the rest of the tour was quite fun and a bit intriguing as well. Steve told stories about his favorite restaurants, how he’s bumped into many celebrities over the years and battles between George Westfield and JP Morgan over electrical outlets. The educational worth was only outweighed by entrainment value. A view of Times Square, Indian dance performers, regular street performers, and a man dressed in a costume of Woody from Toy Story laid the icing on this metaphorical cake.

The last thing I can note, in beauty and in design would be the Brooklyn Bridge after dark. Immaculate and formidable this was the Atheistic Helen of Troy of the trip, for me. My phone had ran out of power from wandering and I took my photos from the bus. We rounded the bridge just one more time for me to get some photos, and I caught some shots just as we left back to town in Batavia.

It was a fun trip regardless of the long time to get there, ambling around vendors from another world, and the melancholy of the museum. Everything had a counterbalance, like with the solemn allure of the museum, the festive air of an NYC festival, or the care of my fellow club members, there was something that made the trip memorable, in a funny off kilter sort of way. I advise anyone and everyone to join this amiable, intriguing club. I haven’t talked to many of the members myself due to my escapade, and would love to meet you there. The next meeting is on Monday, October 6th in T102 from 5:00-6:30pm. There is a cost to join but you can’t be turned away because there is grant money. I hear there will be pizza if any is interested. But remember, the real privilege of this group is its company.